AuthorMarina

10 Ways Printers Can Help Designers

This is an article I wrote for Printing Impressions a while ago and rather than rewriting it, I think it is still apropos in its entirety. If you are a designer or a printer, you can use this to reach out to your customer/vendor and start a dialog that will improve your work and your project. Speaking of which, on May 1st I will be speaking in Kansas City, MO about collaboration between printer, designer, and marketer. If you are in the neighborhood, I would love to shake your hand. Here’s the link.

10 Things Printers can Teach Designers:

Designers are visual people and the best way to teach a visual person is to show them. Graphic designers are also curious people who generally like to see how things work. We all walk around with our cameras all day, lauding their efficiency for email, Slack, twitter and more. But it is the instant transmission of images and videos that make showing easy-as-pie.

Here are 10 ways you can use your smartphone to reach out to your designer clients, add value to your company website and make life easier for yourself. (Sales managers, appoint one person to collect this kind of knowledge and disseminate to the whole sales team.)

1. Coated vs. Uncoated. Sit down with a designer and have two paper swatch books in front of you and explain coated paper versus uncoated paper. You will have saved yourself countless hours of “it looks like postcard paper” descriptions, and the like.

2. Bleeds. Take a video of your guillotine cutter in action, preferably a job with a bleed. Zoom in on the crop marks, text it to your designer client. (Put it on your website too!)

3. Grain. Look in your sample room for something with a nice black solid. Pull two samples. Fold one sample with the grain. Fold the other sample against the grain. Put them side-by-side folds-up and photograph with your phone. Open the image and crop to relevant image area and mark as a favorite in your phone for quick retrieval.

4. Waste=Cost. Show your client an illustration of paper waste for various page sizes. Here are some examples you can use: (Put it on your website too!)

5. Quantity matters. Walk into your pressroom and film a sheet-fed press at the delivery end while it is running for 30 seconds. Confirm run speed with pressman. Text video to the client explaining that’s how long it takes for (insert quantity here) brochures/posters, etc. to run through the press and why they should opt for digital printing on this short run. (At 15,000 iph 30 seconds is 125 sheets, 8-up that’s 1000 pieces!)

6. Printing is green. Calculate how many pounds of trim, corrugated and electronics you recycle each year (if your trim is picked up and weighed by a recycler they have this info). Next time your vendor picks up a container run out to the parking lot and take a pic. Put the photo on your website with an infographic of the tonnage you recycle annually. Explain that the trim and corrugated goes into future recycled paper products.

7. Ink can change color. Show your client this photo. Explain that the ink formulas with a high percentage of opaque white (basically all pastels) will shift within a year (swatch on left was two years old, on right 6 months, when photographed). Share that pastel colors are great for a short-lived item like an invitation not so great for an identity system.

8. Paper makes a difference. Next time you’ve got an attractive job with photos that’s going to run on white paper, order some extra sheets of ivory, canary and grey uncoated paper. Add those colored sheets to the job and photograph the same detail area of all four colors. Make a montage (easy with the Layout app for iPhone). Send this montage to a client who is wondering about running a job on colored stock and put it on your website too.

9. How to read a swatch book. Oh boy, if I had a penny for every time a customer found the “perfect paper” in a swatch book and placed an order specifying that sheet only to find out there wasn’t enough, or it wasn’t stocking or that the chosen color had been discontinued… This is a great topic to discuss at a quick lunch with a new customer. Text her an image showing how to look up the date of a swatch book. Then bring her some lunch and a few swatch books and show her how to “read” it.

10. Art takes time. Text your idea of a rudimentary schedule to your client as a pdf graphic they can print out and pin to their idea wall. Next time they are working with a client to develop a timeline they won’t guess and it saves them and you a call/email.

I know that some will think that answering questions and fielding problems bring value to a client, and they do. But do they bring value to a business owner? If staff is reacting/interacting at the 100-foot level, how are they going to interact at the 30,000 foot level with intention? Focus on the little things with intention and planning and then the 30,000-foot questions aren’t as scary. What are your clients’ plans for next year? Are you discussing budgets internally? Are they planning on launching any new products or services within the next six months? These conversations are really easy when “what do I need a bleed for” is taken care of.

(all images from “Designing for Print, the Art & Science, used with permission please repost with credit)

Share

Success is a Double-Edged Sword

I’ve got some good news and some bad news.

But before I get to that, I want to put this news into a world context. My prayers and whatever aid I can give, to all of those affected by the recent storms and quakes. My “bad news” isn’t anywhere in the ballpark of that kind of having-your-home-and-family-swept-away kind of news. I get it. If you know of a designer who has lost their library because of recent events, please email me through the contact form on this site and I will do my best to get a copy of Designing for Print into their hands.

Now, the good news is the Kickstarter campaign has funded! There are 14 hours to go, so it is not too late to get your incredibly discounted copy of Designing for Print. There isn’t a ton of time either, so if you are interested I would definitely put this is in the do-right-this-minute column of today’s tasks! Click here.

The bad news is I have been so incredibly, phenomenally busy with the Kickstarter that I haven’t put any new content up for a while. I apologize for that. I really do love hearing what you think of what I am putting out there and receiving feedback on how it is helping you out.

Short and sweet, I’ve got to get back to Kickstarting!

 

SaveSave

Share

Clean Files – The Good, the Bad and the Fugly – Part 2

I had a WordPress glitch and accidentally posted this draft of a post, sorry about that! If you want the real post you can find it here it covers:

  • Bleeds
  • Process Colors (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black)
  • Rich Black
  • Specifying process colors
  • Applying cmyk Color to Type
  • Choosing a Color Library
  • Specifying Pantone Solid Color
  • Specifying a Spot Varnish or uv
  • Naming Colors
  • Hairlines
  • Clean Pasteboards
  • Final Page Size
  • Proofing Type
  • Fold Marks

Meanwhile, the opportunity to preorder my book, Designing for Print is now! When I started the Kickstarter I was thinking the retail price of the book would be $85.00. But as things are progressing I am thinking the retail price will need to be close to $100 for me to cover my costs so now is definitely the time to get it for $50! Don’t wait, seriously, you will want to have this on your desk while you are designing or getting estimates. Design departments, get one copy for each team member and get everyone on the same page! Printers, buy them as gifts for your customers!  Pre-Order Now by clicking here

Share